Jun 4, 2 years ago

Videos: Sugar Shane Mosley retires, OTB list his sweetest victories

 Words: Petra Kirsch – Gelsenkirchen

Photo: Stacey Verbeek – Maple Avenue Boxing Gym, Dallas

American pugilist and guaranteed future hall-of-famer Shane Mosley (46-8-1, 39ko) has hung up the gloves at age 40, stating he is proud of his “great career” and that he “loved every minute“. The Californian also went on to explain that the catalyst for his retirement was his desire to “help young boxers, not fight them”. Mosley may have lost on eight occasions, but his victories were outstanding and On The Beak have listed ten of his greatest

Direct link to article.

Mosley may have waved goodbye to the fight game, but will live long in boxing

10: Golden Johnson – January, 1999 – Pensacola – IBF lightweight world title defence – 7th Rd KO

As both a lightweight campaigner and then champion, Mosley was fierce, unforgiving and always looking for a highlight reel finish. Not only was he undefeated at the weight, he had incredible speed and fine power. Against Golden, he demonstrated acute body-punching ability and stopped the fight at the end of the seventh round when a deflated Johnson took a knee and refused to get up.

(Embedded video above credit – YouTube, Marvindiggla)

9: John John Molina – May, 1998 – Atlantic City – IBF lightweight world title defence – 8th Rd TKO

Like his triumph over Johnson, Mosley’s dominant victory at Molina’s expense was fought within the confines of the 135lb weight class. Molina was an archetypal tough man from Puerto Rico but Mosley produced a textbook jab, launched exquisite right hands over the top, threw startling combinations and fortified his reputation as a body-puncher whilst standing up to the cracks that Juan – or John John – landed on his chin.

(Embedded video above credit – YouTube, Marvindiggla)

8: Luis Collazo – February, 2007 – Las Vegas – interim WBC welterweight title challenge – 12 Rd UD

At 35-years-old, Mosley demonstrated his ability to fight like a man ten years his junior as he battled closely with Collazo during the opening half of the bout, but pulled away and took complete control in the second half as Collazo’s determination drained. Mosley was too strong, conditioned and too busy and inflicted a more comprehensive defeat onto the welterweight southpaw than British pressure fighter Ricky Hatton did.

(Embedded video above credit – YouTube, Deledero160191)

7: Fernando Vargas II – July, 2007 – Las Vegas – non title junior middleweight fight – 6th Rd TKO

In their 2006 ruckus, Fernando was on point while Mosley was not himself, however, Vargas’ face swelled up to the size of a Nikolai Valuev fist, forcing an unsatisfactory stoppage in the American’s favour. Their duel the next year, though, was markedly different as Sugar Shane slaughtered the popular Oxnard pug with a precise jab, ring generalship, surprise lead left hooking, swift combos and all too often beat Vargas to the punch.

(Embedded video above credit – YouTube, Rocio997)

6: Shannan Taylor – March, 2001 – Las Vegas – WBC welterweight world title defence – 6th Rd TKO

Mosley’s best form was regarded to be as a lightweight, yet his performance over Shannan Taylor – a pure beatdown – cemented his status as a serious player at welterweight, as well as providing him with a second successful defence of the WBC championship at 147lbs. Mosley cut up the Australian, made him wrench with body blows and almost out-landed him by a ratio of 3:1. Taylor finished the fight on his stool, before combat could resume in the sixth.

(Embedded video above credit – YouTube, 456Blaine)

5: Jesse James Leija – November, 1998 – Mashantucket – IBF world title defence – 9th Rd TKO

Leija was not the greatest of Mosley’s opponents, but Shane’s beating of him was so resounding, so brutal, that it has to be included amongst his best wins. Leija tasted the canvas in the sixth round, as well as the eighth and ninth and couldn’t box on in the tenth. While Sugar ended his career with underwhelming performances against Floyd Mayweather, Sergio Mora, Manny Pacquiao and Saul Alvarez, it was in the late ’90′ when vintage Mosley could be seen.

(Embedded video above credit – YouTube, Marvindiggla)

4: Philip Holiday – August, 1997 – Uncasville – IBF world title challenge – 12 Rd UD

One of Floyd Mayweather’s best fights is regarded to be his first title fight against Genaro Hernandez, who was deemed to be one of the best in the division at the time. Similarly, Holiday too was perceived to be the finest 135lb boxer when Mosley took him apart. Shane won between eight and nine rounds (dependent on judgement) and limited Holiday’s output. It was Mosley’s fight… and turned out to be his coming out party.

(Embedded video above credit – YouTube, Mangler411)

3: Wilfredo Rivera – September, 1999 – Temecula – non title welterweight fight – 10th Rd KO

Like throwback fighters who boxed before the existence of ‘Super’ and ‘Junior’ weight divisions, Mosley jumped up from lightweight to welterweight and took on three-time world title challenger Rivera, a durable Puerto Rico. In a tussle that could have gone either way on the judges’ scorecards, Mosley – inspired by father/trainer Jack’s pep talk – fought like a man possessed in the tenth and final round as Rivera received a kayo.

(Embedded video above credit – YouTube, 4mirkhan)

2: Oscar de la Hoya – June, 2000 – Los Angeles – WBC/IBA welterweight challenge – 12 Rd SD

Mosley twice defeated de la Hoya and while his second win saw him bounce back to elite significance following two defeats to Vernon Forrest and a no contest against Raul Marquez, it was his first – the debut event at STAPLES Center in Los Angeles – that elevated Mosley to a superstar and a champion of two weight classes. Considered one of 2000′s classic encounters due to it’s two warriors going back and forth, de la Hoya’s reputation was also enhanced – even in defeat.

(Embedded video above credit – YouTube, FaceofBoxing)

1: Antonio Margarito – January, 2009 – Los Angeles – WBA welterweight challenge – 9th Rd TKO

While some may point to the de la Hoya win deserving the number one spot, veteran Mosley was a 4/1 underdog against an avoided Margarito in 2007 but trounced Antonio en route to a ninth round technical knockout. There is an old adage in boxing that every great fighter has one last great performance… and this was Mosley’s as the brutality bestowed upon the Mexican made analysts and fans reminisce about Shane’s lightweight pomp.

(Embedded video above credit – YouTube, BorgesProductions)

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May 1, 2 years ago

Antonio Margarito and Jose Benavidez Jr in separate Arizona bouts on May 26

On The Beak – Admin

Former three-time welterweight world champion Antonio Margarito (38-8-0, 27ko) will once again take to the ring, as it has been announced this his next fight will be held on Saturday, May 26, and will be televised by TV Azteca, as the Tijuana Tornado will be taking on Abel Perry at the Casino Del Sol Resort AVA Amphitheater in Tucson, Arizona. The bout will be supported by a performance from Jose Benavidez Jr against undetermined opposition.

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Perry, hailing from Colorado Springs, Colorado sports a record consisting of 18-5-0, 9ko, has been in with Patrick Thompson, James De La Rosa, Marteze Logan, Donald Camarena and Grady Brewer. He is also a form fighter, riding a five win streak, four by stoppage.

Margarito is coming off a fight against Miguel Cotto last December that resulted in a disappointing stoppage by the commission doctor due to a swollen right eye, however, the tough Mexican stated that he is extremely happy to be able to continue with his boxing career and looks forward to getting back into the ring and fighting  for his fans.

Margarito versus Perry will be a ten round main event bout.

Also on the nine-bout fight card will be undefeated KO artist Hanzel Martinez vs German Cruz, Phoenix, Arizona’s own undefeated Super Lightweight Jose Benavidez Jr. vs. TBA and Undefeated Lightweight Jose Roman vs. Javier Garcia.

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Dec 27, 3 years ago

Margarito on a Cotto trilogy and possibility of injury-enforced retirement

Robert Delgado – Los Angeles

Antonio Margarito is eager to secure a third go at Miguel Cotto as, with the two bouts finely balanced at one apiece and, considering the manner in which the rematch ended earlier this month, the Mexican believes a trilogy is required; something he wants to discuss further with Top Rank Boxing founder Bob Arum, who also promotes Cotto. Should there be a lack of big fights available to Margarito, then he would consider hanging up his gloves…

Direct link to article.

Does Margarito need Cotto to remain relevant at elite-level? Credit: Stacey Verbeek – Maple Avenue Boxing Gym, Dallas

“I don’t feel that Cotto beat me,” said Margarito (38-8-0, 27ko) to Fight News recently, continuing his vehement opposition to the referee’s intervention on December 3 at Madison Square Garden.

Experienced officiator Steve Smoger retired Margarito before a punch was thrown in the tenth round’s genesis, deeming the swelling under Antonio’s problematic right eye too severe for him to continue, however, Smoger later mused in his post-match reflections that, despite Cotto’s near shut-out dominance to that point, it was Margarito who was perhaps showing the greater conditioning and was arguably coming into the fight during the championship rounds.

Indeed, such a stance is backed by Margarito, who stated: “It was a copy of the first fight. I knew that I was losing the fight but my conditioning was great and I felt that I hurt him in that round [nine] more than any other [and] I was throwing punches well. I said that if they gave me one more round, I was going to go for the knock out. It was the [ringside] doctor that beat me. The doctor was from New York, they knew, they knew…”

Margarito’s eye had been a subject of fierce debate. His right eye had taken a pulverisation when the fast fists of Manny Pacquiao systematically targeted it and caused a fracture of the orbital bone and a detached retina. The 33-year-old did not re-enter the ring for 13 months as a result of injuries sustained during that fight and was only given the all-clear to box by the New York State Athletic Commission just days prior to the Cotto (37-2-0, 30ko) rematch.

“My doctor checked me in the dressing room; he said my eye was fine. Cotto didn’t really hit me with a solid punch for my eye to swell up that way. It was more from grazes. The one that really hit me and made it swell up from a single punch was Manny Pacquiao. I do think its sensitive from the operations but I think that I am okay.”

Margarito’s dissatisfaction with the result of the rematch has sparked a desire inside him to pursue a second rematch, something Team Cotto are reportedly willing to consider as they too would like a more conclusive finish: “I was told that they would like to do a third fight because I think that not even they were happy with the ending. They are seeing if there is a possibility to do a return match in May or June.”

Should Cotto instead be matched with middleweight supremo Julio Cesar Chavez Jr, like promoter Arum has publicly iterated, then Margarito’s options become limited: “If its not with Cotto, I am not going to say I would retire, I have to sit down with Top Rank and see what they have planned. If its something good, then I would consider it bit if its not, then I would have to say good bye to boxing.

“Retirement has passed through my mind because of the issues with my eye and if I am giving my opponent an advantage but we are going to talk to my promoter and see if he has something good for me.”

Margarito, though, has not secured a win over a name opponent since his 2008 teekayo of Cotto; their first duel. Since then, he has gone 1-3-0, 0ko due to a loss to Shane Mosley, a decision win over Mexican journeyman Roberto Garcia and straight losses to Pacquiao and Cotto. With his poor recent run, there are few opponents who would provide Margarito with the purses he has been accustomed to receiving, although one name does stand out – that of lineal middleweight champ Sergio Martinez.

With Martinez’s own chase of bigger fights with pound-for-pound prizefighters like Pacquiao, Floyd Mayweather Jr or a shot at current WBC honcho Chavez Jr, a chance to avenge his first defeat to Margarito may not be high on the agenda…

Related article: Cotto confident he can out-fox Pacquiao in rematch, Steward agrees but Roach is not keen

Related article: Cotto avenges his first loss by teekayoing teak tough Margarito

Related article: Referee Smoger praises Margarito and Cotto’s warrior instinct, stoppage was due to doctors orders

Related article: Fight Photos: Cotto v Margarito II – the shots, the victory, the emotionless celebration

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Dec 5, 3 years ago

Referee Smoger praises Margarito and Cotto’s warrior instinct, stoppage was due to doctors orders

Robert Delgado – Los Angeles

The reason referee Steve Smoger was hesitant to stop Miguel Cotto and Antonio Margarito‘s scintillating rematch at Madison Square Garden in New York City was due to the challenger, Margarito, was fighting with a stubborn pressure, was desperate to box a further round and because he wanted to make sure all the ring physicians were in agreement. However, the consensus – on fight night on December 3 – was that Antonio’s eye was closed.

Direct link to article.

Smoger hidden by Puerto Rican and Mexican warriors. Credit: Stacey Verbeek – Maple Avenue Boxing Gym, Dallas

“I had never seen Miguel Cotto box so skillfully,” said Smoger to Boxing Talk, before marveling at Margarito’s conditioning. Furthermore, the third man in the ring last weekend also spoke of how he was aware that “Cotto had something cooking.”

Renowned East Coast referee – and also a regular on the judging circuit – Smoger expressed his delight at being in the ring with what he described as warriors: “[Margarito] did not take one step back the entire evening.  And every time he was hit, he smiled and said, “Woooooo!” [These warriors] gave it everything they had!”

Margarito’s right eye has been the subject of much conversation since it was fractured by the unrelenting and blazingly-quick fists of Manny Pacquiao last year. The orbital bone was smashed, he had to have a cataract removed, an artificial lens inserted and was only granted medical clearance to fight in the state of New York last month.

In a similar fashion to the Pacquiao fight, Margarito’s eye was cut, then swelled and eventually closed and thus jeopardised his vision. In total, Cotto (37-2-0, 30ko) landed 86 punches to the area and it became a cause of concern for the doctors at ringside.

Smoger explained: “After the ninth round, we go to Margarito’s corner. The doctor called me over. And they get [Anthony Currieri] who is one of the top rated opthalmologists in the country. Antonio was pleading to continue. He said: ‘Steve, please! Give me one more round!’ But the doctor said: ‘Steve, you have to stop it. The eye is closed.’

“I hesitated because I wanted to make sure that all of the doctors were in agreement. I wanted to make sure. It’s hard to stop a fight when a guy keeps coming forward. Tony fought valiantly and I always want to give the fighter every opportunity, so I wanted to make sure that there was no confusion about this.”

He continued by concluding that the nature of the fight, together with Cotto and Margarito’s styles and hearts, helped sooth the sores from recent fights that have ended controversially: “This year, we’ve had several incidents with fighters hugging and kissing and quitting, and complaining about shoulder injures and low blows…

“But Margarito wanted to fight! His eye was closed and he wanted to fight! He had no excuses whatsoever and that’s what boxing is all about. You want warriors? Give me Tony Margarito! Give me Miguel Cotto!”

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Dec 4, 3 years ago

Fight Photos: Cotto v Margarito II – the shots, the victory, the emotionless celebration

All Pictures: Stacey Verbeek – Maple Avenue Boxing Gym, Dallas

The nature of Miguel Cotto‘s winning performance over tough hombre Antonio Margarito – a one-sided tenth round technical knockout – has reaffirmed the Puerto Rican’s status as the number one campaigner in the super welterweight division. On The Beak photographer Stacey Verbeek was ringside in the Madison Square Garden, New York City, to document Cotto’s successful avenging of his first career defeat.

Direct link to article.

Cotto extended his unbeaten run in both the Garden and in New York City as he trounced Antonio

Cotto used a head-high guard, lateral movement and a primary boxer-puncher display to dominate his opponent

Cotto received instruction between rounds by Pedro Luis Diaz, a Cuban who constructed the perfect gameplan

Margarito managed to evade some moves, but Diaz took Cotto back to basics with his focus on footskills and the jab

According to HBO Punch Zone, Cotto landed 86 shots to Margarito's right eye, which eventually swelled and sealed shut

On The Beak gave Cotto the ten score in every completed round. After the official announcement, Cotto was emotionless…

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Dec 4, 3 years ago

Fight Photos: Cotto, Margarito and the stars of the New York card

All Pictures: Stacey Verbeek – Maple Avenue Boxing Gym, Dallas

In an action-stacked fight card on December 3 in New York, it was the Top Rank Boxing main event between Miguel Cotto (37-2-0, 30ko) and Antonio Margarito (38-8-0, 27ko) that was the unsurprising bout of the evening as ‘Super’ WBA super welterweight championship incumbent Cotto – under the guidance of new trainer Pedro Luis Diaz – executed a punch perfect gameplan that involved both stick-and-move and tear-up tactics.

Direct link to article.

Cotto's face bore a few minor blemishes after going nine full rounds and three seconds with Margarito

Miguel's wife Melissa was in tears during the 2008 fight, but the rematch would have made easier viewing

Unheralded Cuban coach Diaz appeared a bizarre pick after Cotto's split with Steward, but Diaz's tactics were spot on

Cotto targeted Margarito's right eye, which sealed shut and sealed his fate as he succumbed to a late stoppage

Joe Gallagher (left) trainer of John Murray (right), who went 11 hardcore rounds with Brandon Rios

Bam Bam Rios struggled to make weight at 135lbs and will likely move north, to super lightweight (140lbs)

Wolak (above, pre-fight) failed to pressure Rodriguez as often as he did in the first fight and it cost him the win

Rodriguez is occasionally unfancied for decision calls but out-pointed Wolak with his precision

Rising welterweight contender Mike Jones, a rangy fighter, decisioned Sebastian Lujan in an uneventful contest

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Dec 4, 3 years ago

Cotto avenges his first loss by teekayoing teak tough Margarito

Alan Dawson – London

Miguel Cotto produced a boxing masterclass by winning a shut-out victory over ‘Super’ WBA super welterweight world championship challenger Antonio Margarito at Madison Square Garden in New York City on Saturday, December 3. Cotto won every minute of every round by circling Margarito and showing a superior skillset throughout. Antonio was stopped on his feet prior to the tenth, as the referee halted the contest under advisement of the ringside physician.

Direct link to article.

Dawson’s scorecard

Round 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Cotto
10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 -
- -
Margarito
9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 - - -

Official verdict: Tenth round technical knockout.

In New York, Margarito was public enemy numero uno yet the hatred felt for the Mexican did not faze Antonio, who seemed to revel in his role as the villain. The story’s hero was, of course, Miguel Cotto, who had the crowd in raptures when ring announcer Michael Buffer introduced the popular Puerto Rican.

Throughout the first round, Cotto boxed like he had done in his first fight with Margarito. He moved laterally around his target, peppering Margarito with combination-punching. One pre-fight talking point will have been about how, in Cotto’s mindset, Margarito fought him with gloves loaded with a plaster of Paris-like substance. However, how would the champion react if/when Margarito was able to summon up the same power and strength he had shown Miguel three years ago? From the opening two rounds alone, it was impossible to tell as Antonio couldn’t root his boots in order to plow a power punch into the Puerto Rican’s kisser as Cotto was constantly on the bounce.

A further conversational point had focused around the health of Margarito’s right eye that had been fractured and required multiple surgeries after the pulverisation handed to him by Manny Pacquiao last year. He had only been granted a license to box in NYC last week after being given a medical all-clear, but the whole ordeal presented Cotto and his team with an obvious target and, as early as the third round, a laceration to the side of the right eye opened up with a coloured swelling over it.

The third round had drama aplenty as, even though he had built up a formidable ascendancy by boxing-and-moving, Cotto elected to trade with Margarito – much to the delight of the blood-thirsty crowd. Margarito smiled when he was punched, shook his head as if to say he wasn’t hurt, but the marks on his mush told a different story.

Margarito landed his most powerful punch of the fight in the fourth when a hard right hand crashed into Cotto’s jaw. Cotto, though, responded like a champion by hitting his enemy with hateful left hooks. In the fifth round, Cotto – with his confidence growing with every minute – pummeled Margarito with five-punch combos. Cotto was wary about Margarito’s power… when he was backed against the ropes, whilst maneuvering away from danger he kept a glove close to his chin and temple in order to provide a cushion from incoming shots.

In the sixth round, the message behind every jab landed on Margarito’s right eye had revenge attached to it. A late starter, Margarito – like he did in the first bout – had begun to turn the tide by hounding Cotto with abuse and had his best successes when Cotto was trapped against the ropes. For Antonio, though, he would need to further work on cutting the ring off and closing/taking away the gaps that Cotto could move in to in order to gain a ten score, yet Cotto, too, was wise to this.

By the end of play in round seven, Margarito’s eye had swollen like it had done versus Pacquiao and the ring doctor was forced to check in on the proud Mexican, asking if he was okay and testing him by asking how many fingers was he holding up. In the eighth, Cotto continued to use lateral movement, yet was moving to his left, which was now Margarito’s blind side. Midway through the round, he double-jabbed Margarito’s problematic eye.

Jabs, left hooks and straight rights all connected with the eye that was becoming close to inspiring the doctor to deem the Mexican unfit to continue. Cotto had a perverse dedication to ruining Margarito’s face. Like the third round, there was a further toe-to-toe tussle with huge machismo shown by both fighters. Cotto crunched Tony with an uppercut, rocked his head back with a cross and threw fists with a reckless abandon.

The eye was so bad by the end of the ninth that Margarito was not allowed out to continue in the tenth. Cotto had stopped his nemesis, his enemy, the man he feels has most wronged him… he gave Margarito a boxing lesson and, in so doing, avenged the first loss on his record. It was a powerful performance and a skillful display, the Margarito loss in 2008 can be put behind him so he can now move on to other talent in a saturated 154lb weight class.

Cotto rose to 37-2-0, 30ko with the win, while Margarito dropped to 38-8-0, 27ko.

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Dec 1, 3 years ago

Fight Photos: Cotto and Margarito exchange harsh words at final press conference

All Pictures: Stacey Verbeek – Maple Avenue Boxing Gym, Dallas

Miguel Cotto and Antonio Margarito, two boxers with genuine bad blood, exchanged verbal power punches at the final press conference ahead of their Saturday, December 3 clash at the Madison Square Garden in New York City that, if fists were used instead of words, would have caused knockdowns aplenty. Margarito said a super flyweight hits harder than Cotto, who retaliated by reiterating that he regards Antonio to be a “criminal”.

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The fighters and their coaching staff in front of the rematch backdrop used to aid the event's promotion

Cotto's coach Pedro Luis Diaz: "You're gonna see a great fight on December 3, this time with a different ending".

Miguel: "A criminal is one who uses weapons… you (Antonio) are an embarrassment to boxing".

Cotto (left) and Margarito (right) are both a part of Bob Arum's (centre) stable at Top Rank Boxing

Antonio: "He can hit my eye as many times as he wants. He hits like a little girl. A super flyweight hits harder".

Tony's trainer Robert Garcia: "We had a great camp. We're prepared for the best Cotto. Tony is mentally, physically ready".

Brandon Rios (left) fights on the undercard. With Garcia (right) he attended the Rockefeller Tree Lighting Ceremony

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Dec 1, 3 years ago

Video: Miguel Cotto training with new coach at New York’s Trinity Boxing Gym

On The Beak – Admin

Renowned Cuban Olympic coach Pedro Luis Diaz and three-weight world champion Miguel Cotto may have only had a single training camp to become acclimated with one another but, judging from recent training sessions, it appears as though the pair have developed a strong understanding. The pair are gearing toward a December 3 showdown with Antonio Margarito and, in the video below, can be seen working on footwork, pad-work, the heavy bag and the skipping rope.

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(Embedded video above credit – Youtube, ResSports)

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Dec 1, 3 years ago

Fight Photos: Cotto works up a sweat on the pads during media workout

All Pictures: Stacey Verbeek – Maple Avenue Boxing Gym, Dallas

At the Trinity Boxing Gym in New York City and under the glare of the boxing media’s camera lenses, the reigning ‘Super’ WBA super welterweight world champion Miguel Cotto, of Puerto Rico, went about his light workout routines. The popular prizefighter defends his belt in the Madison Square Garden on Saturday, December 3 against bitter rival Antonio Margarito – a hard Mexican warrior who leaves it all in the ring.

Direct link to article.

Cotto, currently 36-2-0, 29ko, warms up on the treadmill while listening to music

Cotto rehearses his punch routines at the Trinity Boxing Gym, mimicking the moves he'll unleash on fight night

Note how Miguel has his chin tucked in and his dukes up when operating on the inside in a defensive position

One of the things coach Pedro Luis Diaz has won acclaim for is his focus on Cotto's footwork

Diaz and Cotto have only worked together for this camp. Margarito, meanwhile, is accustomed to his trainer Robert Garcia

Soaked in sweat, Cotto rehydrates following completion of his workout. He will be looking to make 154lb weight on Friday

Cotto has just two losses on a strong resume. Against Antonio, he has the chance to avenge one of his bloody defeats

Cotto's conditioner and strength guru Phil Landman

Respected strength and conditioner Phil Landman has long had a partnership with Cotto. The Puerto Rican currently campaigns within the confines of the 154lb weight class and, according to Landman, he occasionally – depending on the camp – has to shred up to 20lbs.

A durable pugilist, Cotto takes on a fighter known for his guts. A distance classic is likely to ensue. Landman explained recently that the best way to enhance endurance is to undergo: “lots of steady aerobic work and consistency, anaerobic conditioning is very important to.”

He added that he has also been incorporating different exercises in order to address the added pressure that Team Cotto expects Margarito to provide.

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