Jul 1, 2 years ago

Gary Russell Jr bulldozes through Christopher Perez, wins third round KO with four knockdowns

Denzil Stone – Atlantic City

Featherweight sensation Gary Russell Jr continued his climb up the division ranks with a dominant third round knockout over Christopher Perez on Saturday, June 30 at the Fantasy Springs Resort Casino in Indio, California. Russell outclassed Perez primarily with his unmatched hand speed, powerful and precise flurrying and general ring nous. With one knockdown scored in the second round, followed by a further three in the third, a teekayo win was awarded.

Direct link to article.

Stone’s scorecard

Round 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Perez
9 8 6 - - - - - - -
- -
Russell
10 10 10
- - - - - - - - -

Official verdict: Gary Russell Jr by way of 3rd Rd TKO.

Occupying the centre of the ring immediately, Russell Jr (20-0-0, 12ko) bossed the space and almost the entire opening minute had it not been for a countering right hand landed by Perez; his most significant punch of the round. Russell, though, demonstrated his blazing-fast hand-speed, landing solitary shots but also loading up on leather and attacking the Mexican with combinations.

In round two, Russell’s flurrying began with body blows and concluded upstairs and it was this style of move that produced a knockdown in the final minute of the round. Showing a good finisher’s instinct, Russell went after Perez (23-3-0, 14ko) when he had returned to his feet, stalked his prey, caught Christopher with a mighty left hook and generally forced the Sinaloa 126lber into a retreat.

Russell scored a crucial second knockdown at the beginning of the third round, knocking Perez through the ropes and onto his seat, prompting the referee to tell Perez that he ‘needs to show him something’. That something did not arrive, though, and Russell floored him again with two minutes left to wind down on the round clock.

Then, a right hand dropped Perez and the officiator immediately took over, took a hold of Perez and invited the ringside physician into the ring. Russell then returned to his corner, nonplussed, and had his gloves taken off while Another One Bites The Dust played out.

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Jul 1, 2 years ago

Erislandy Lara cuts Freddy Hernandez up, wins ten round decision

Denzil Stone – Atlantic City

Freddy Hernandez fought a courageous fight on Saturday, June 30 at the Fantasy Springs Casino in Indio, California but was out-boxed by canny Cuban Erislandy Lara. For ten rounds, Lara’s accuracy was outstanding, his combination-punching on point and his ability always one level above his opponent’s, yet his ten round victory was marred slightly by his occasional use of dirty tactics…

Direct link to article.

Stone’s scorecard

Round 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Hernandez
9 9 10 9 9 9 10 9 9 9
- -
Lara
10 10 9
10 10 10 9 10 10 10 - -

Official verdict: Lara by unanimous decision (95-94, 98-91, 99-90).

During the opening sessions, Lara (17-1-1, 11ko) asserted himself with two fundamental assets: speed and strength, however, there were occasional blemishes to the overall nature of the bout as headbutts occurred. The left hand to the body was key for Lara and it was thrown with great aggression. Hernandez, who was stopped in a solitary round by Andre Berto during a WBC welterweight world championship contest in 2010, slipped behind Lara in terms of scoring after two stanzas as he just couldn’t match the Cuban’s combination punching.

Hernandez, though, upped his accuracy in round three and his left hook in particular inspired Lara to move into other spaces within the ring. With this success, Hernandez boxed in the fourth round with pressure and aggression in mind. And, in round five, body shots were exchanged, inside fighting ensued and a physically gruelling pace was maintained. Straight punches to the face caused bleeding from the eye region on the Mexican, evidence that Lara’s punches had notable pop.

When the fight had reached it’s halfway mark, Lara had successfully busted Hernandez up. The body-shots at the beginning of the fight had led to openings that allowed him to land crisp and thudding straight left punches into Freddy’s face. Further to this, the Cuban also landed tortuous shots to the midsection and used his jab to a: find-range and b: parry Hernandez’s punches. In the final minute of the sixth, Lara riled the crowd with what appeared to be a jumping headbutt, but all that did was bring the fighter out of Hernandez who clapped his gloves and implored Lara to stand and trade.

Ignoring the referee’s request to keep it clean prior to each round, Lara again butted Hernandez at the beginning of the seventh and so a point was duly deducted from his tally. With a cut-laden and bloody face, the ringside physician inspected Hernandez after the round and, within moments of the eighth’s commencement, Lara pounded his opponent with crunching one-two combos. Despite the lacerations, Hernandez continued to be a game adversary but couldn’t pin Lara where he needed to be in order to negate Erislandy’s foot speed – against the ropes or the corner.

In the closing rounds, question marks rose regarding Lara’s conditioning but he still found the finish line with an incredible authority, landing often, powerfully and accurately. By the end of the fight, Hernandez’s cheek bone was swollen and red, his brow was cut and he also sported claret nicks over his face… Lara, in contrast, appeared relatively unscathed and it was this image that was the definitive factor in the fight. Hernandez was a valiant warrior but ultimately one who was continually outclassed by the economic, resourceful and stronger fighter from the blue corner; Lara.

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Apr 25, 2 years ago

Sillakh v Grachev, Evans v Fortuna on FNF; Jhonson v Hernandez, Jack v Brand on ShoBox

On The Beak – Admin

On April 27, undefeated light heavyweight contenders Ismayl Sillakh (17-0-0, 14ko) and Denis ‘The Pirate’ Grachev (11-0-1, 7ko) will meet in the ten round main event on ESPN’s Friday Night Fights (FNF) at the Frank Erwin Center in Austin, Texas. Sillakh of California has won his last two fights by knockout. A victory Friday, will position him to fight the winner of Bernard Hopkins v Chad Dawson II.

Direct link to article.

In March 2011, Sillakh won a ten round decision against previously undefeated 2004 Cuban Olympian Yordanis Despaigne on FNF. His manager Ivaylo Gotsev said: “When you watch Ismayl float through the ring, you just can’t help but be reminded of Muhammad Ali… he floats like a butterfly and stings like a bee.

“He’s like this reincarnation of these old fighters that were so pretty to watch and had the passion for it. He loves what he’s doing and has an incredible passion for this sport.”

California’s Grachev, a former professional kick boxer, has won his last three fights, two against previously undefeated fighters. Grachev said of Friday’s fight: “I know a lot about Sillakh. He’s a good, good fighter – strong, big amateur background. He’s very good in his pro career, but I’m going to break him.”

In the co-feature, undefeated junior lightweights Yaundale ‘Money Shot’ Evans (16-0-0, 12ko) and Javier ‘El Abejon’ Fortuna (18-0-0, 13ko) will meet in the ten rounder. Evans, of Cleveland, is coming off a third-round TKO win over Andres Ledesma, while Fortuna of California won a 10-round unanimous decision over Miguel Roman in his last fight.

*

The following week, five promising boxers – four of whom are unbeaten – make their debuts on ShoBox: The New Generation on Friday, May 11 at Texas Station Gambling Hall and Hotel in Las Vegas. Former Cuban amateur standout and 2004 Olympian, junior middleweight Yudel Jhonson (12-0-0, 8ko), and six-time Swedish national champion and 2008 Olympian, super middleweight Badou Jack (10-0-0, 8ko), head up a strong contingent of talented, undefeated newcomers on a telecast that also includes power-punching super middleweight Alexander Brand (17-0-0, 15ko) and skilled lightweight Rances Barthelemy (15-0-0, 11ko).

The southpaw Jhonson, of Miami, Florida, faces former world title challenger Freddy ‘El Riel’ Hernandez (30-2-0, 20ko), of Mexico City, in the ten round junior middleweight main event. Hernandez, who is coming off a unanimous ten round decision over ex-world champion Luis Collazo, will be making his fourth start on ShoBox.

Unbeaten super middleweights Jack and Brand clash in the eight-round co-feature. Jack, of Las Vegas, by way of Stockholm, Sweden, is a former sparring partner of Floyd Mayweather and Andre Dirrell. Brand, of Bogota, Colombia, is the longest tenured boxer in the history of the Colombian Olympic team with 437 fights as an amateur.

In the opener of a televised tripleheader, Barthelemy, of Havana, Cuba, meets southpaw Aalan Martinez (10-1-1, 6ko), of East Los Angeles, via Michoacan, Mexico, in an eight round lightweight bout.

Jhonson was the Pan American Junior Champion at light fly in 1998 and the Cuban National Champion at welterweight in 2002 before capturing a silver medal at the 2004 Olympic Games. Overall, he went 379-16 in the amateurs while winning numerous titles. He turned pro on May 22, 2009, shortly after he’d defected to the United States with fellow Cubans Yordanis Despaigne and Guillermo Rigondeaux.

The 5-foot-10, 30-year-old Jhonson fought four times in 2009, five times in 2010, and three times in 2011. He is coming off a third-round TKO over Eduardo Mercedes last Oct. 15 in the Dominican Republic. Jhonson registered a career-best seventh-round TKO over Richard Gutierrez on March 25, 2011. The following June 3, Jhonson won a 10-round decision over Jose Torres.

The vastly more experienced Hernandez is 3-0 on ShoBox. Two of the victories came against former world champions in back-to-back fights in 2010 – a fourth-round TKO over Mike Anchondo on September 17 and a fifth-round knockout over DeMarcus ‘Chop Chop’ Corley on February 5. In his ShoBox debut on October 23, 2009, Hernandez registered a unanimous ten round decision over southpaw Damian Frias.

The 5-foot-10, 33-year-old Hernandez, a pro since February 2001, has performed well in three of his last four outings. On October 15, he dropped Collazo in the eighth to win by the score of 96-93 on the three judges’ cards. Hernandez’ only defeat since losing a split 12 round decision to Golden Johnson on Feb. 25, 2005, came when he stepped way up in class and lost to then-world champion Andre Berto in November, 2010.

Jack has thus far been consistently impressive whilst campaigning on American canvas

In the co-feature, Jack, who trains at the Mayweather Boxing Club in Las Vegas, will be making his sixth consecutive start in the US. His initial five fights after turning pro on June 6, 2009, took place in Sweden or Finland. The 6-foot-1, 28-year-old Jack started boxing at age 18. He went 122-28 as an amateur and represented his father’s country, Gambia, in the Olympics. He is the only boxer to represent Gambia in any Olympic Games.

Regarding his upcoming scrap, Jack said: “Both of us are big punchers. It’s going to be an exciting fight for the crowd. I like to go to the body a lot, that’s one of my biggest weapons. I’ll be ready for him.”

In Brand’s amateur career, he went 417-20. Brand, 35, turned pro at the age of 32 on August 9, 2009. Campaigning exclusively in Colombia, he won his first 12 professional fights by (T)KO. This will be his second outing in the US. In his stateside debut, Brand won a unanimous six-round decision over Terrance Woods last November, in Las Vegas.

Brand, who’s fought twice in 2012, is coming off a fifth-round knockout over Luzimar Gonzaga last March 30, in Cartagena, Colombia. Meanwhile, Barthelemy, 25, is a 5-foot-11 crowd-pleasing puncher-boxer who won his last start with an impressive eight-round unanimous decision over former top amateur star and then-unbeaten pro, Hylon Williams, on February 3, in Las Vegas.

Boxing’s in Barthelemy’s blood. Two of his siblings are also prizefighters — older brother Yan, the 2004 Olympic Gold medalist at light flyweight, and younger brother, Leduan. Their cousin is longtime pro, Giorbis Barthelemy.

Rances started to box at an early age: “As a child in Cuba, I had a lot of discipline problems in school and I was always getting into fights,” he said. “I was diagnosed as being hyperactive. So the school’s personnel took it upon themselves to place me in their sports curriculum and I was selected for the boxing program. I’ve been fighting since.”

Nicknamed ‘Kid Blast,’ the fast-rising Barthelemy had an impressive amateur career, winning the majority of his 200 fights and earning the Cuban junior national championship before defecting to the US. He turned pro on August 8, 2009, in Columbia, SC. The confident Cuban scored knockouts in his first 12 fights, but has gone the distance in two of the last three.

Martinez rebounded from the lone defeat of his career to knock out Ronald Rodriguez in the third round last December 16, in Vernon, California. After the 5-foot-9, 28-year-old Martinez won his pro debut in October 2004, he fought just one time in both 2005 and 2006. After three fights in two and a half years, he didn’t fight again for four and a half years. But the southpaw slugger has been much more active since, fighting three times in ’09, four times in 2010, and twice in 2011.

Martinez’ only loss came when he came up short in a competitive matchup against Evgeny Gradovich on April 29, 2011, in Las Vegas. Martinez lost a six-rounder by the scores of 58-56 and 59-55 twice.

The event is promoted by Warriors Boxing.

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Apr 18, 2 years ago

It’s ‘put up or shut up’ time for Jermain Taylor as Caleb Truax bout looms on Friday

Denzil Stone – Atlantic City

Former undisputed middleweight world champion Jermain Taylor, 33, continues his comeback quest on Friday, April 20 at the Beau Rivage Resort and Casino in Biloxi, Mississippi. Caleb Truax, an undefeated Minnesota standout who narrowly beat Andy Kolle in his most recent fight, is his opponent. Taylor’s trainer, Pat Burns, is purring over his pugilist’s condition and, in the words of the prizefighter himself: “It’s time to put up or shut up“.

Direct link to article.

Taylor (1-0-0, 1ko in his comeback) is raring to repeat his Nicklow victory by impressing against Truax. Credit: Team Taylor

“This has been another great camp and I am really looking forward to this fight,” said Taylor, who has been working predominantly on drills, training and fine-tuning skills during camp, rather than making weight as he began his first week’s training already in shape at 170lbs. “This is the new-old Jermain,” he added. “I am back to working really hard, and I am really focused… this fight is another step toward regaining my championship.

“My body feels great,” Taylor, who was once atop the 160lb division due to wins over Cory Spinks, Winky Wright and a brace over Bernard Hopkins, stated in the build-up to his first fight of the year. “I know what it takes and what I have to do to become champion again, but first I need to take this kid’s zero. I was praying the other day and God told me to go in there and kick this kid’s butt, and that’s exactly what I plan on doing.

“It is time to either put up or shut up.”

Taylor’s career began to decline in 2007, as he embarked on the first of two losses to an in-form Kelly Pavlik. A points victory over Jeff Lacy halted a winless run but he then suffered two successive knockouts to Carl Froch and Arthur Abraham. A brief retirement period followed, prior to a late 2011 return versus Jessie Nicklow in a contest that saw a return to the division Taylor (29-4-1, 18ko) was most dominant in – middleweight.

At 160lbs, Burns believes he can plot a path back to supremacy for his fighter, however, he recently stressed the importance of first taking care of the Minnesota champion Truax (18-0-1, 10ko): “We are not underestimating this kid by any means. There is no sense in looking down the road until we take care of the challenge that is standing right in front of us. That being said, the things Jermain has been doing in this camp are absolutely unbelievable and I know he is going to impress a lot of people on April 20.”

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Mar 19, 2 years ago

Fight Photos: Omar Figueroa canvasses Ayala with body blows, Randy Caballero outpoints Araiza in gritty encounter

All photos credit: Tom Casino/Showtime

Omar Figueroa (15-0-1, 12ko) overwhelmed Ramon Ayala (22-3-1, 11ko) with brutal body shots to score a second-round TKO in the main event of ShoBox: The New Generation, March 16. In the co-feature, Randy Caballero (14-0, 7ko) kept his perfect record intact with a tough unanimous decision victory over veteran Jose Luis Araiza (32-6-1, 23ko) by the scores of 98-92 twice and 97-93 from Fantasy Springs Resort Casino.

Direct link to article.

Ayala met the deck because of kayo-happy Figueroa’s attention to the mid-section

The win sees the 22-year-old lightweight secure his third successive triumph by way of stoppage

Figueroa returned to ShoBox for his second appearance on the series and earned another stoppage. In his usual style, the all-action pressure fighter from Weslaco, Texas dominated Ayala with power shots for nearly two full rounds before the fight was halted. Ayala, of Morelos, Mexico, seemed to deal with the head shots, but the body blows proved too much.

Figueroa landed a left to the gut in the first that staggered his opponent but it was the left hook to the liver in round two that spelled the beginning of the end. Figueroa, who threw more body punches than his opponent by a tally of 19 to 2, followed the liver shot with a barrage of shots to finish the taller Mexican. Ayala attempted to hold but Figueroa let him drop to the canvas and referee Lou Moret began the count. Ayala returned to his feet by the count of nine but wobbled backwards and Moret ended the contest at 2:53.

“It surprised me when he didn’t try to box because he is a pretty tall guy,” said Figueroa. “Once he started throwing power shots with me, I knew it wouldn’t last long. He had decent power so I was careful of his wild shots but I never thought the fight would make it past the third or fourth round.”

Emerging bantamweight prospect Caballero enjoyed an early authority against Araiza

In the opening bout of the night, Caballero, of Coachella, Calif., added another win to his perfect record but it didn’t come easy. The charismatic 21-year-old enjoyed the comforts of fighting amidst the cheers from his hometown crowd and won the first several rounds over a tentative Araiza, of Tecate, Mexico.

Poise and good hand speed carried Caballero until Araiza picked up his pace, aggression and punch output in the sixth round. Araiza tagged Caballero with many hard shots in the second half of the bout and took Caballero to the tenth round for the first time in his young career. The late surge by Araiza brought excitement to the fans but not enough rounds to come back against Caballero. The victory earned Caballero the vacant NABO bantamweight title in his 118-pound debut.

“This was more of a learning experience for me,” said Caballero after the bout. “We knew he was going to try to do a couple of things in the ring and I let him do them a couple of times. That’s my mistake so we’re going to go back to the gym and keep working so we can come out even better next time.”

Victory over Araiza was arguably Caballero’s toughest to date as Randy had to weather a late storm

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Mar 16, 2 years ago

Cameron Dunkin lauds Caballero, Randy speaks out on ShoBox, Araiza and his personality outside boxing

On The Beak – Admin

Randy Caballero’s manager Cameron Dunkin feels his fighter is at the top of a long list of talented Coachella Valley boxers who are ready to contend for multiple world championships: “He’s a terrific talent and had a fantastic amateur career,” said Dunkin, who also manages Nonito Donaire, Kelly Pavlik and Brandon Rios. “He’s just part of this really good group of fighters from that Indio area that is really hot. Randy sells tickets and the crowd loves him. He’s an exciting, energetic fighter who I think will be a world champion someday.”

Direct link to article.

Caballero in tough with Araiza. Credit: DeWalt Power Tools

Caballero (13-0-0, 7ko) will make his ShoBox debut in what will be the toughest test of his career against Tecate, Mexico’s Jose Luis Araiza (29-5-1, 20ko) in a ten-round bantamweight co-featured bout on March 16. In the main event, undefeated prospect Omar Figueroa Jr. (14-0-1, 11ko), of Weslaco, Texas, will take on Morelos, Mexico’s Ramon “Nino De Oro” Ayala (23-2-1, 11ko) in a ten-round lightweight fight.

The ShoBox doubleheader, which is presented by Golden Boy Promotions and sponsored by Corona, DeWalt Tools and AT&T, will be televised live at 11 pm. ET/PT (delayed on the West Coast) on Showtime.

Trained by his father Marcos and brother Robert, Caballero has won his last seven consecutive bouts – and eight overall – at Fantasy Springs Resort Casino. The 21-year-old prospect answered six questions just days before the fight.

More than half of your pro fights have been in Indio. Are you on a first-name basis with most of the employees at Fantasy Springs?

Caballero: “Oh, yeah. They’re all like family to me. I see them and they say good luck and they wish me well. The boxing fans in Indio are very knowledgeable and have been so great to me and I thank them for that. When I start my ring walk and I hear the crowd I get so pumped because I know they are all rooting for me. It’s a real advantage and something I’m thankful for.”

What does it mean for you get the call from Showtime and to appear on ShoBox?

Caballero: “When I got the call from Showtime I just couldn’t believe it. I know it’s the next step for me and that my career is on the right path. This fight will just get my name out there even more and show that I’m capable of being one of the greatest boxers out there. We do have a good crop of fighters from this area and we want to showcase that. There’s no better place to do that than on Showtime.”

You’ve been boxing for more than half your life. Did you ever have dreams of doing anything else?

Caballero: “No, not really. I just love the feeling that I get when I step into the ring. I’ve been fighting since I was eight-years-old. It’s what I know and what I love.”

Do you follow the sport and consider yourself a fan of the game?

Caballero: “No, I wouldn’t call myself a huge boxing fan. I mean, I watch all the big fights on Showtime and follow the guys I’ve come up with, but that’s about it.”

You have fought some tough fighters in your first 13 pro fights. Do you think you’ve matched up well against each of them?

Caballero: “I’m happy with the opponents I’ve faced and beaten. Regardless of who they put in front of me, everyone is dangerous. You get caught with a left hook and it can end your career so I don’t take anyone lightly. Everybody who steps into that ring is going to get hit and I believe this guy I’m fighting on Friday is a big step up for me. He’s a veteran and he knows all the tricks inside the ring.”

Can you describe your personality?

Caballero: “I’m a real family guy. I like to hang with family, that’s about it. I’m pretty low-key. I like to go out with friends here and there but I’m kind of a reserved guy. I’m a quiet guy but very respectful and very friendly. I don’t like to talk too much smack. I would say I’m a fun guy to be around.”

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Feb 26, 3 years ago

Vargas and Latimore notch victories on ShoBox, Tyner and Nunez drop decisions

On The Beak – Admin

Welterweight Jessie Vargas and junior middleweight DeAndre Latimore were victorious, as expected, in the co-featured fights Friday on ShoBox: The New Generation but it wasn’t easy for either of them. In the main event, the undefeated Vargas, of Las Vegas, improved to 18-0-0, 9ko with a hard-fought albeit lopsided ten-round decision over Lanardo Tyner (25-7-2, 15ko) of Detroit. Vargas won by the scores of 99-91 (x3) in a fight he was made to work in.

Direct link to article.

Vargas continues his ascent in the 140lbs/147lbs divisions by recording his 18th pro win. Credit: Showtime

Latimore (23-3, 17ko), of Las Vegas by way of St. Louis, had it much tougher. Making his first start in more than ten months, he took a ten-round majority decision over Milton Nunez (23-4-1, 21ko) of Barranquilla, Colombia. However, he had to overcome two knockdowns – one questionable — to do it. Latimore got the nod in a much closer scrap than anticipated by the tallies of 96-92, 95-94 and 94-94.

There were no knockdowns in Vargas-Tyner, but each went down twice from low blows. Tyner hit the canvas in the first and fourth, Vargas in the fourth and eighth. It was the second consecutive hard fight for Vargas. Last September, he came away with a split ten-round decision over Jose Lopez. There was some question whether Vargas deserved the victory against Lopez, but this time he left no doubt.

A vicious left hooker to the body, Vargas, 22, showed excellent poise and maturity against Tyner, who tried repeatedly to get into his head and take him out of his game plan: “I don’t think this was my toughest or hardest fight, but it was a good fight,” said Vargas, who was sporting a cut on the upper left side of his head afterward. “This was just another learning experience. I need these kinds of fights against these kinds of fighters to stay in position to move forward.

“I probably could have moved and boxed more, but he took my out of my game plan a few times. There were times when all I wanted to do was connect with the big shot.” He continued: “That low blow he got me with in the fourth round was definitely the hardest low blow I’ve ever been hit with. I’ve never been nailed with anything like that before.”

Mentored by Floyd Mayweather, Vargas stated that Tyner will have served a good learning experience

Latimore seemed to be cruising through eight rounds. He’d boxed well and dictated the pace. At times, it seemed that Nunez might be ready to go but Latimore was content to exercise patience and box. With less than 25 seconds remaining in the ninth round, Nunez scored the first of his knockdowns with a short overhand right hand. He followed with a barrage of nearly 20 punches, the majority of which landed, but Latimore survived and made it to the bell.

Knowing he still was well ahead on points, Latimore came out on his bicycle in the 10th. But he got caught again.

“It was my first start in nearly a year and I’m just happy to get the win,” said Latimore, who was making his first start for new trainer Jeff Mayweather. “Honestly I didn’t care if I won by ten points or one, I just wanted the win. I had to pace myself at times but I did what I had to do and what Jeff wanted me to do. The second knockdown wasn’t a knockdown,” he said. “I went down from headbutts.

“It is what it is, though, and I look forward to getting back to work in the gym and fighting on a regular basis.”

The hard-hitting Nunez felt the fight should have been stopped in the ninth.

“I knocked him down and was hitting him with a barrage of right and left hands and the referee [Joe Cortez] moved in and stepped between us. I thought he was going to stop it. You don’t do what the ref did and not stop the fight.

“Still, I thought I’d done enough to win.”

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Feb 19, 3 years ago

Dulorme seals brutal knockout over Ambriz, Gonzalez outpoints tough Lyell

All Pictures: Tom Casino/Showtime

Puerto Rican pair Thomas Dulorme and Jonathan Gonzalez remained undefeated with impressive victories on Friday on ShoBox: The New Generation. In the main event, Dulorme (14-0-0, 11ko), of Puerto Rico, captured the vacant NABF welterweight title with a devastating first round KO over late substitute Aris Ambriz (16-3-1, 8ko) of California. Super welterweight Gonzalez (15-0-0, 13ko), also of Puerto Rico, opened the telecast with a solid, hard-fought unanimous ten round decision over Ohio man Billy Lyell (24-11-2, 5ko) at Chumash Casino Resort.

Direct link to article.

A familiar sight in a Dulorme fight as the Puerto Rican puncher's opponent attempts to recover from a canvassing

Dulorme mostly overwhelmed Ambriz, twice knocking him down, the first time with a powerful left hook. A wobbly Ambriz, who took the fight on one week’s notice after Jose Reynoso withdrew with an injury, made it to his feet, but moments after absorbing a couple more solid shots, went down from a right hand that left him out and flat on his back.

“I was prepared physically and mentally to go ten rounds and I didn’t come in looking for a knockout, so for it to end in the first round was a present for me,” said Dulorme, who’s ranked in the top ten by both the WBA and WBC. “I’ll be back in the gym on Monday trying to learn more. That’s what I do best. Every time I step in the gym it’s all about learning.”

Gonzalez did the business against a durable and experienced battler in the 154lb weight class

Gonzalez, more workman-like than spectacular, won a solid fight with continual two-way action by the scores of 98-92 and 97-93 (x 2). There were no knockdowns.

“I’m happy with the result and the way this fight went,” said Gonzalez, who is ranked by three of the four boxing organizations and was making his first start in eight months. “I expected a hard fight and I trained for a tough guy who had fought a lot of good punchers who couldn’t knock him out. We knew he was a worthy opponent.

Super middleweight contender Pavlik with Lyell post-fight

“Lyell was tough but it was clear that I won. I felt I was in control and that I hurt him a couple times. I had a few rounds where I allowed a couple flurries, but they always hit the gloves and I was never hurt. I hope to get back into the ring again soon.”

Lyell, who comes to win, always gives his best and had his Youngstown buddy, former world champion Kelly Pavlik in his corner for introductions, had no complaints with the decision, or the scoring.

“He won, probably seven rounds to three, so I have nothing to gripe about,” Lyell said. “My plan was to go in and back him up, but I couldn’t do it. I couldn’t believe how strong he was.”

ShoBox expert analyst Steve Farhood, who called the doubleheader alongside blow-by-blow announcer Al Bernstein, was impressed with both 22-year-old winners.

Talented Thomas poses with NABF belt

“Dulorme has it all as a prospect,” Farhood said. “He has a pleasing personality, good looks, and when he scores a knockout his opponent is left flat on the canvas, and that separates him from the pack. He’s as exciting a prospect as we’ve seen on ShoBox in quite a while.”

Speaking of Gonzalez, Farhood said: “The difference in this fight was clearly Gonzalez’ obvious advantages in size and strength. The fact his fight went the distance is in no way a negative because of the quality of opponent he was in with.”

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Feb 9, 3 years ago

Thomas Dulorme’s NABF welterweight title shot to go ahead, Aris Ambriz drafted in as late replacement

On The Beak – Admin

Undefeated Puerto Rican welterweight prospect, Thomas Dulorme (13-0-0, 10ko), was scheduled to fight Jose Reynoso (15-3-1, 2ko) on ShoBox, February 17, but Reynoso pulled out with a hip injury. Aris Ambriz (16-2-1, 8ko) has agreed to step in as a late replacement and the main event will move forward.

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Promoter Gary Shaw stated: “Ambriz is a tough fighter and he’ll give Dulorme everything he’s got. This is a big opportunity for him going up against one of the best up and coming prospects in boxing and he’s promised to deliver a great show. Dulorme is ready to go and he’s looking to shine on ShoBox.”

Dulorme versus Ambriz is for the vacant North American Boxing Federation (NABF) welterweight title in the main event on ShoBox: The New Generation on Friday, February 17, live on Showtime (11 p.m. ET/PT, delayed on the West Coast). The bout takes place at Chumash Casino Resort in Santa Ynez, California.

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Feb 5, 3 years ago

Dulorme sees NABF belt as stepping stone to world title, but Reynoso sends warning to Thomas

On The Beak – Admin

Thomas Dulorme (13-0-0, 10ko), of Carolina, Puerto Rico, will face surging southpaw, Jose Reynoso (15-3-1, 2ko), of Riverside, California, by way of Mexicali, Mexico, for the vacant NABF welterweight title in the main event on ShoBox: The New Generation on Friday, February 17, live on Showtime. The headlining fighters will make their ShoBox debuts in a ten round welterweight bout with a contracted limit of 143 pounds.

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Dulorme wants to start his 2012 with a bang but Reynoso has different plans

In the co-feature at Chumash Casino Resort in Santa Ynez, the power-punching Puerto Rican, Jonathan “Mantequilla” Gonzalez (14-0-0, 13ko), of San Juan, will battle Billy Lyell (24-10-2, 5ko), of Warren, Ohio, in a ten round junior middleweight match.

Despite having only 13 fights, Dulorme (pronounced Do-Lore-May) is already ranked in the top ten by both the WBA and WBC. A hard-hitting sort who also can box, the highly regarded Dulorme has been spectacular and explosive enough to warrant the lofty praise but he’ll get his toughest test to date against Reynoso, who’s unbeaten in his last six starts (5-0-1).

“I’m always looking to fight the best guys available and I’m expecting a good fight,” the crowd-pleasing Dulorme said. “I’ve been in with left-handers before,” he added. “Fighting for the first time in 2012, I want to come out with a bang and show the audience on ShoBox that I’m the real deal.

“Capturing the NABF title will get me one step closer to my dream of becoming a world champion.”

Since turning pro after a terrific amateur career that included winning a Golden Gloves championship, the 5’9.5 Dulorme, has campaigned in three weight classes: welterweight, junior welterweight and lightweight.

Dulorme won a four-round majority decision in his pro debut on August 13, 2008. His next ten fights ended by knockout — two in the first round, eight in the second. He’s been victorious in his last two starts via lopsided decision, a ten round triumph over former world champion DeMarcus “Chop Chop” Corley on June 10, 2011, and a nine-round win over world title challenger Charlie Navarro the following October 22.

Although he knows he’s an underdog, Reynoso is anxiously awaiting this fight, his first since taking an eight-round decision over Esteban Almarez on June 22, 2011.

“This is the most important fight of my career. I’m fighting for everything, and this fight means everything to me,” the 5-foot-7, 27-year-old Reynoso said. “I’ve seen tapes. I know he’s undefeated and a hard banger, but he hasn’t fought solid opposition like I have. He’s strong, but I’m strong too, and I plan to put him to the test. If I have to trade shots, I will. I have much more power than my record says.

“This isn’t the first time I’ll enter the ring an underdog, so I’m used to that kind of pressure. I’m coming to win and I’m going to surprise everybody.”

In the co-featured bout, Gonzalez, who’s ranked by three of the four major boxing organizations, is 14 fights into a career that began in January 2009. A former amateur standout and a 2008 Olympic representative for Puerto Rico, he’s rated seventh in both the WBC and WBO and 12th in the WBA.

This will be Gonzalez’ second consecutive start on ShoBox. In his debut and most recent outing last June 11, he recorded a unanimous ten round decision over Richard Gutierrez. It was the first time the 5-foot-11, 22-year old Gonzalez had gone the distance since he went pro. None of his previous 12 outings had lasted more than seven rounds. Eleven of the knockout wins came within three sessions.

Lyell is a durable, hard-luck 27-year-old who doesn’t seem to get the benefit of the doubt in tough fights against favoured fighters on the road.

In his last bout, the 5-foot-9 Lyell lost a majority 10-round decision to local favorite Dominik Britsch (25-0 going in) on Oct. 22 in Germany. On January 29, 2011, he came up on the wrong end of a close ten round decision to Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. (41-0-1 going in) in Mexico.

One fight that went Lyell’s way: He scored a shocking split ten round decision over previously undefeated John Duddy on April 24, 2009.

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