Oct 28, 3 years ago

Mayweather – Ortiz PPV generates $78m: ‘Floyd is in league of his own’, says Schaefer

Denzil Stone – Atlantic City

The numbers are in… fight fans have been waiting six weeks since Saturday, September 17 for the official figures for the pay per view purchases that the Star Power event headlined by Floyd Mayweather Jr and Victor Ortiz received, and that number is 1.25 million, placing it as the fifth* highest grossing non-heavyweight PPV event ever. It also generated $78,440,000 in PPV revenue.

Direct link to article.

Mayweather marches to the circle of truth with 50 Cent. Credit: Stacey Verbeek – Maple Avenue Boxing Gym, Dallas

“My motto is ‘hard work and dedication’ and I have shown this throughout my entire career, which has allowed me to go out and perform each time I step in the ring,” Mayweather (42-0-0, 26ko) said, commenting on the news. “I give the fans everything I have with the best competition and exciting fights. I must be doing something right as they keep buying my fights and I appreciate their tremendous support. It feels good to be able to generate such a great interest in the sport.”

Mayweather defeated Ortiz by way of fourth round knockout due to a one-two combination that involved a left hook and right cross, however, the move drew ire from the fans in the MGM Grand Garden Arena, Las Vegas and a section of those watching around the world as it was unleashed whilst Ortiz was unawares, had his hands low and appeared confused over whether referee Joe Cortez had initiated time-in. The break, though, occurred because Ortiz had intentionally fouled Mayweather by jumping in with the crown of his head.

The Star Power card also featured a thrilling contest between a young and hungry Mexican – Pablo Cesar Cano – fighting on US canvas for the first time, providing Erik Morales with a game opponent. Both fighters left the ring cut up and bloodied, yet it was Morales who won via stoppage and became the first from his country to become a champion of four weight classes. This, on top of Saul Alvarez’s WBC super welterweight world championship defence against Alfonso Gomez which was broadcast on a big screen in the MGM Grand, as it was staged in Los Angeles, but packaged as part of Star Power

CEO of Mayweather Promotions, Leonard Ellerbe, believes the success of the Star Power PPV proves that Mayweather is a boxing icon. He said: “Every time Floyd steps into the ring, he reminds us that he is the greatest fighter in the sport today and certainly its biggest star.

“The financial success of his fight with Victor Ortiz reinforces Floyd’s position in the sport as iconic and he should be appreciated for bringing all of this attention and good fortune to the sport. His pay-per-view success is staggering and the history books will reflect this impact.”

Richard Schaefer of Golden Boy Promotions, who helped stage the event, added: “Star Power showed again why they call him “Money” Mayweather. When it comes to pay-per-view, Floyd is clearly in a league of his own.

“Not only does he now hold the record for the top three grossing non-heavyweight pay-per-view events, but he also holds the record for the single biggest pay-per-view event of all time.

“I am excited to continue to break records with Floyd and his Money Team, because records are made to be broken!”

*The Star Power event is the fifth highest non-heavyweight pay-per-view event of all time, behind Oscar de la Hoya’s contest with Felix Trinidad (1,400,000), de la Hoya versus Floyd (2,400,000), Manny Pacquiao against Shane Mosley (1,300,000) and Mayweather and Mosley (1,300,000). Star Power is equal to the official numbers for Pacquiao and de la Hoya and Pacquiao and Miguel Cotto (both 1,250,000).

Top May-Per-View Boxing Events
Numbers
1: Oscar de la Hoya v Floyd Mayweather
2,400,000
2: Floyd Mayweather v Shane Mosley
1,400,000
3: Victor Ortiz v Floyd Mayweather 1,250,000
4: Floyd Mayweather v Juan Manuel Marquez
1,050,000
5: Floyd Mayweather v Ricky Hatton
920,000

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Oct 27, 3 years ago

Anti-doping agency release Floyd Mayweather Jr and Victor Ortiz’s test results

Denzil Stone – Atlantic City

The United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), the body responsible for the Olympic-style blood testing that was contractually agreed upon by welterweight boxers Floyd Mayweather Jr and Victor Ortiz for their September 17 fight, have released their findings regarding the ten separate and random tests that each fighter was subjected to. Nine ‘sample collections’ occurred with no advance notice while the tenth occurred immediately after the Las Vegas contest.

Direct link to article.

Athlete Sample Collection Date
Type of Sample
Determination
Floyd Mayweather Jr
July 22, 2011
Blood and Urine
Negative
Floyd Mayweather Jr
July 28, 2011
Urine
Negative
Floyd Mayweather Jr
August 3, 2011
Urine Negative
Floyd Mayweather Jr
August 10, 2011
Blood and Urine Negative
Floyd Mayweather Jr
August 15, 2011
Urine Negative
Floyd Mayweather Jr
August 23, 2011
Blood and Urine
Negative
Floyd Mayweather Jr
August 29, 2011
Urine Negative
Floyd Mayweather Jr
September 8, 2011
Blood and Urine
Negative
Floyd Mayweather Jr
September 15, 2011
Urine Negative
Floyd Mayweather Jr
September 17, 2011
Blood and Urine
Negative
Victor Ortiz
July 17, 2011
Urine Negative
Victor Ortiz
July 27, 2011
Urine Negative
Victor Ortiz
August 3, 2011
Urine Negative
Victor Ortiz
August 9, 2011
Blood and Urine
Negative
Victor Ortiz
August 17, 2011
Urine Negative
Victor Ortiz
August 23, 2011
Blood and Urine
Negative
Victor Ortiz
August 29, 2011
Blood and Urine
Negative
Victor Ortiz
August 31, 2011
Urine Negative
Victor Ortiz
September 7, 2011
Blood and Urine
Negative
Victor Ortiz
September 17, 2011
Blood and Urine
Negative

Results table for random blood and urine testing. Credit: USADA.

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Sep 26, 3 years ago

Star Power: Ortiz v Mayweather speculated to have received 1.3m PPV buys

Denzil Stone – Atlantic City

The recent world championship match-up between Victor Ortiz and Floyd Mayweather Jr – that the latter won by way of fourth round knockout on September 17 – received 1.3 million pay-per-view purchases, according to a report on Fight Hype. If the figure turns out to be correct, then it will equal the buys received for the PPV card headlined by Manny Pacquiao and Shane Mosley in May, earlier this year.

Direct link to article.

Mayweather Jr reclaimed welterweight title on Sept. 17. Credit: Stacey Verbeek – Maple Avenue Boxing Gym, Dallas

Fight Hype further state that, due to the $59.99 price for standard definition with an added $10 fee for high definition, Mayweather Jr could pocket up to $40 million for his win… $10m per round of action. It is the fourth time in Floyd’s already illustrious and belt-laden career that he has achieved a greater number than one million PPV buys.

Pre-fight, Golden Boy Promotions CEO Richard Schaefer had forecasted that the Star Power event – that also featured live footage of Saul Alvarez and Alfonso Gomez’s super welterweight battle in Los Angeles together with undercard action from Erik Morales versus Pablo Cesar Cano and Jessie Vargas against Josesito Lopez – would fetch between 1.7 and 1.8 million purchases.

“The numbers should be somewhere between 1.7 or 1.8 million range,” Schaefer was quoted by MLive.com to have said.

The official figures are yet to be confirmed.

Top Ten Pay-Per-View Boxing Events
Numbers
1 – de la Hoya v Mayweather Jr (2007)
2.400,000
2 – Tyson v Holyfield II (1997)
1.990,000
3 – Lewis v Tyson (2002)
1.970,000
4 – Tyson v Holyfield I (1996)
1.590,000
5 – Tyson v McNeeley (1995)
1.550,000
6 – Holyfield v Foreman (1991)
1.400,000
6 – de la Hoya v Trinidad (1999)
1.400,000
6 – Mayweather Jr v Mosley (2010)
1.400,000
9 – Tyson v Bruno II (1996)
1.370,000
10 – Pacquiao v Mosley (2011)
1.300,000

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Sep 19, 3 years ago

Floyd Sr backs Mayweather Jr: Win over Ortiz was 100 percent fair

Denzil Stone – Atlantic City

There should be no controversy over the one-two combination that Floyd Mayweather Jr knocked Victor Ortiz out with in the fourth round of their world championship fight on September 17 at the MGM Grand Garden Arena, says the fighter’s father Floyd Mayweather Sr, who also highlighted of Victor’s “intentional” headbutt. Mayweather Sr reminded Ortiz of the “number one thing in fighting” to “always protect yourself“.

Direct link to article.

Mayweather Jr grimaces after being fouled by Ortiz. Credit: Stacey Verbeek – Maple Avenue Boxing Gym, Dallas

“First of all, Ortiz headbutted Floyd and that was obviously intentional,” Mayweather Sr said to TMZ, looking back at the event-packed fourth round that saw Ortiz flurry at Mayweather Jr, become frustrated as he wasn’t landing, lunge with his head, had a point deducted by referee Joe Cortez and was then staggered by a left hook and knocked down and out with a right cross from Floyd.

“If you re-watch the fight, you can see that right after they apologise to one another, the ref okays them to fight,” added Mayweather Sr. “Floyd did the right thing — the number one thing they will tell you in fighting is to always protect yourself. The way Floyd ended the fight was 100 percent fair.”

Mayweather Jr (42-0-0, 26ko) also felt that the ire he received immediately after the fight was not fair, claiming that sportscaster Larry Merchant never gives him “a fair shake” when he was probed as to whether his now notorious finishing of Ortiz (29-3-2, 22ko) was sportsmanlike.

Later, he told the assembled media that: “Once we touch gloves it’s fight time – open season. It’s the hurt business, it’s boxing. We’re there to get it on.”

Ortiz, meanwhile, repented for the illegal move – the headbutt – he used that cut Mayweather Jr on the chin: “He put his hand up and elbow [during play]. So I put my head in. No. It wasn’t a fair fight. I paid for my mistake.”

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Sep 19, 3 years ago

Fight Photos: Star Power pt 8 – Mayweather Jr lifts new title, Ortiz jovial in defeat

All Photos: Stacey Verbeek – Maple Avenue Boxing Gym, Dallas

Floyd Mayweather Jr added another belt to his bulging wardrobe due to his fourth round knockout victory over former welterweight world champion Victor Ortiz, on September 17. On The Beak‘s fight photographer Stacey Verbeek was ringside at the MGM Grand Garden Arena and also present at the post-bout press conference to snap the new titlist and the fallen underdog.

Direct link to article.

Against tradition, the champion – Ortiz – made his way to the ring first and occupied the blue corner

Victor's facial demeanour prior to the opening bell was in stark contrast to the one he bore after his knockout loss

Close friend Curtis James Jackson III aka 50 Cent accompanied Floyd Mayweather Jr to the ring

No nervous sweat as it was business as usual for welterweight challenger Floyd and his Money Team

Fiddy watched on as Floyd, whilst collecting ten scores in the early rounds, was not as dominant as he had been in the past

Excitable Vicious lost his head as he tried to use it as a weapon against Mayweather Jr after becoming frustrated

Floyd grimaces after having his chin cut when he was backing away from Ortiz's butting

Referee Joe Cortez separated the prizefighters and deducted a point from Ortiz for the illegal blow

Mayweather Jr recovered soon after and, as soon as time in was called, knocked Ortiz out with a two-punch combination

Mayweather Jr salutes his fans and haters in the crowd as he celebrates yet another WBC title victory

Roger Mayweather, uncle and trainer to Floyd, was the triumphant cornerman as his nephew outboxed Victor

Despite defeat under controversial circumstances, Victor was all smiles and did not seem upset at the loss

Note the swelling under Ortiz's right eye from four rounds with Floyd, most likely caused from Mayweather Jr's left hooks

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Sep 18, 3 years ago

What we learned from the Floyd Mayweather and Victor Ortiz bout

Alan Dawson and Robert Delgado – London and Los Angeles

The Star Power event had garnered much hype but with the televised undercard curtain-raiser between Jessie Vargas and Josesito Lopez failing to get anyone out of their seats, there was a further burden on the headlining fight to deliver. There were many talking points during and after Floyd Mayweather Jr and Victor Ortiz‘s welterweight championship: from Ortiz’s inability to circumvent Mayweather Jr’s defence, to Floyd’s accuracy, the controversial kayo and, of course, his post-fight comments. On The Beak lists some of ours…

Direct link to article.

The disdain was maintained in the ring but the belt changed hands. Credit: Stacey Verbeek – Maple Avenue Boxing Gym

1: Victor’s southpaw stance was stifled by Mayweather Jr who rifled the right cross

Heading into the contest, staged at the MGM Grand Garden Arena on Saturday September 17, some analysts pointed to Mayweather Jr’s apparent inability to deal with southpaw fighters as effectively as he does to those who line up in the orthodox stance as a potential factor in the fight. However, Victor’s portside fighting was rendered so ineffectual that Mayweather Jr (42-0-0, 26ko) managed to land 49 percent of his heavy hits as he focused more on power punching as opposed to jabbing. It was Floyd’s defensive posturing that ended up proving arduous for Ortiz (29-3-2, 22ko) to crack as he landed none of his southpaw jabs.

Ortiz’s only successful shots were his power punches – yet he only landed a miserly 26 out of 117 (or 26 out of 148 overall). The rest were parried away by Mayweather Jr’s forearms, gloves, or shoulder. Victor could have perhaps enhanced his punches landed statistic by attaching the power punches with the lead jab. His best moment of the night was ultimately his last, when he backed Mayweather Jr onto the ropes and flurried… while the headshots bounced harmlessly off of his opponent’s guard, he had gotten through to the body. That work, though, was undone when he got over-excited and lunged in with his head out of frustration.

Floyd’s accuracy was converse in nature to his opponent. Including the two-punch move that ended the fight, Mayweather Jr landed 12 of his 83 jabs (below his own average) but that small stat was offset with his prolificacy when it came to the left hook and right cross (the combo that incidentally finished Ortiz).

2: Legitimate or not, another Cortez fight ends controversially

Joe Cortez has been synonymous with world championship boxing for decades and has officiated well over 170 professional major title bouts. However, in the past five years in particular, his refereeing is perceived to be invasive, obstructive and obtrusive.

He was deemed to be “too involved” in Ricky Hatton’s fight with Floyd Mayweather Jr and received the same criticism when officiating Amir Khan and Marcos Maidana’s scrap last year. When Evander Holyfield was up against John Ruiz, Cortez deducted a point away from Evander for a “low blow” that was not the real deal but a belt-line shot. His presence at the Humberto Soto and Francisco Lorenzo was also strange for he disqualified Soto after three rounds for punching after the break even though Lorenzo was badly beaten up, suffering multiple lacerations and a horrific broken nose.

With Mayweather Jr and Ortiz, there was an element of confusion as to whether Cortez had called “time in” to allow boxing to resume. Such ambiguity was clarified by the Nevada Commission who backed Cortez and Mayweather Jr, rendering the knockout legit, however, when the left hook struck, Cortez was looking and interacting with the timekeeper outside of the ring. Ortiz was looking over to Cortez, who was unable to see the follow up right cross from Floyd. Whilst the two-punch move was within the Queensberry Rules, Cortez would have been none the wiser if the punches had, for example, been low as – like Ortiz – his attention was not on the fight that he had restarted.

3: A reminder of Boxing 101 as fluid Floyd preserved his zero

It’s an age-old lesson and one reminded to boxers both in the dressing room and also in the ring: Protect yourself at all times, keep yourself protected at all times, keep your gloves up… or any variant thereof.

Before Cortez had instructed the judges at ringside to deduct a point from Ortiz’s card for lunging in with his head while Mayweather Jr was against the ropes, Victor had once already attempted to apologise to Floyd – something he, as the victim, accepted. Ortiz put his arm round him, even kissed his cheek, yet when boxing resumed, he went to hug Floyd as a sorry again. The time to embrace is after the fight, not when there is potentially eight rounds of fighting left to complete. Floyd’s finishing move was not illegal… opportunistic? Yes, but he should not be made a villain for taking advantage of Ortiz’s naivety.

4: Both Floyd and Ortiz seem to fight better when it’s ‘them against me’

The ‘Them vs Us’ scenario has been one that has long inspired athletes to disprove their doubters. In European soccer, current Real Madrid manager Jose Mourinho is a master of it as he deflects attention, uses the press and plays the pantomime villain role perfectly. Any negative column inches are put up in the dressing room and he rallies his teams to domestic and continental success.

With boxing, both Ortiz and Mayweather revel under it. For Ortiz, prior to his loss to Marcos Maidana he was considered the next breakout prospect, but the knockout defeat devastated that status and commentators began questioning his heart and will. He used that ‘everyone is against me’ attitude – something he had since a child – to barnburn his way through Andre Berto earlier in the year and he still had an element of that fire during the HBO: Face Off with Max Kellerman and Mayweather Jr. Instead of focusing his attention on Floyd, Ortiz was zoned in on Kellerman who had been critical of Ortiz’s performance against Maidana. Against Floyd, though, Ortiz was considered the ‘good guy’.

Nobody polarises opinion in boxing more so than Mayweather Jr. It’s a win/win situation for him, it guarantees him a great gate receipt and huge pay-per-view income… whether he is paid to see win or lose, he gets his purse. He even uses his “haters” to motivate himself, as is evident during his stretching and exercising when he barks “I’ve got the most haters” after finishing one rep.

5: Mayweather lacked class, Merchant had brass

Whilst Mayweather Jr deserves no criticism for the manner in which he finished the fight, the censure he will receive for his post-fight “shit”-laden tirade against an 80-year-old Larry Merchant (who has worked with HBO: World Championship Boxing since 1978) is perhaps justified. Merchant and Mayweather Jr do not get along, but to square up and shout “You ain’t shit, HBO should fire you!” to a man 56-years older than him was certainly not one of Floyd’s classier moments.

However, Merchant’s swift retort that if he “was 50 years younger I’d kick your ass!” was arguably worth the pay-per-view fee in itself.

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Sep 18, 3 years ago

Referee Cortez confirms legality of Mayweather Jr’s knockout win over Ortiz

Denzil Stone – Atlantic City

The third man in the ring with Floyd Mayweather Jr and Victor Ortiz on Saturday, September 17 at the MGM Grand Garden Arena, Las Vegas was Joe Cortez, who confirmed after the fight that the two-punch combination that Mayweather knocked Ortiz out with was legal as “time was in“. Furthermore, Cortez – a recent International Boxing Hall of Fame inductee – stated that “Mayweather did nothing wrong”.

Direct link to article.

Referee Joe Cortez in officiating gear. Credit: Stacey Verbeek – Maple Avenue Boxing Gym, Dallas

“Time was in,” Cortez said in his post-fight comments.

There had been an element of ambiguity over the legality of Mayweather Jr’s fourth round knockout victory. Cortez had initially separated the two fighters and sent Floyd (42-0-0, 26ko) to a neutral corner while he instructed each of the ringside judges to deduct a point from Ortiz’s score for lunging in with his head.

When Victor returned to the centre of the ring to further apologise to Mayweather Jr, they touched gloves and, while Ortiz (29-3-2, 22ko) looked to receive instruction from the referee, Floyd flattened Ortiz with a left hook and right cross combination.

Cortez, though, had waved for the fighters to proceed and that boxing could continue. He stated, therefore, that what Mayweather Jr did was within the rules of prizefighting. He said: “The fighter needs to keep his guard up. Mayweather did nothing wrong.”

Following the loss, Ortiz and trainer Danny Garcia began their attempts to lobby for a rematch. Mayweather Jr, meanwhile, sought to downplay the incident by claiming “shit happens” and that when action resumes, it’s open season.

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Sep 18, 3 years ago

Ortiz unconvinced about Mayweather’s greatness, Floyd unapologetic

Ibrahim Harb – Birmingham

Floyd Mayweather Jr and Victor Ortiz‘s WBC welterweight championship prizefight ended in controversy as the defending champion failed to defend himself following a “time in” and so Mayweather swiftly capitalised and flattened Ortiz with a one-two combination. The move inspired jeers within the 14,687 crowd at the MGM Grand Garden Arena, Las Vegas, which Floyd shrugged off after the fight as “shit happens”.

Direct link to article.

Picture: Tempers flared at Mayweather and Ortiz weigh-in. Credit: Stacey Verbeek – Maple Avenue Boxing Gym, Dallas

“I hope you enjoyed this night of boxing,” Ortiz, who relinquished his WBC title at 147lbs to Mayweather, said. “I’m blessed to be in this position. I just want to say thank you for coming out to support me. I would love a rematch.”

Regarding the manner of the knockout, Ortiz (29-3-2, 22ko) explained that he went to apologise for Floyd following his attempted headbutt and the consequent time-out, but he wasn’t aware time had been called in and that fighting could resume. He said: “I fouled; I apologised. The ref said something so I looked up. I am pretty sure he called a break. He [Floyd] put his hand up, so I figured it was a sportsmanlike tap. I apologise to my team on that one.

“He is a great fighter, but I’m still not convinced he’s the greatest. I was doing fine until that slip up. Stuff happens. In the corner, we were both going for it. He put his hand up and elbow [during play]. So I put my head in. No. It wasn’t a fair fight. I paid for my mistake. Money isn’t anything to me, that’s secondary. The public deserves a rematch, honestly.”

Ortiz’s head second, Danny Garcia, protested the nature of Mayweather Jr’s victory, stating that the referee was at fault for his ward’s loss: “We will do everything necessary for a rematch. Victor made a mistake based on Joe Cortez’s instructions. He hit him with some good right hands, but Victor was sustaining it. With that last punch, he didn’t see it. We’re going to work on the inside a bit more.”

Mayweather Jr, meanwhile, was unapologetic for the win that a: preserved his undefeated streak and b: elevated his record to 42-0-0, 26ko. He brushed the incident off as: “Shit happens in the sport of boxing. You wanted to see a KO, that’s what I gave you,” before adding that the only person to blame for Ortiz’s knockout loss is himself as he failed to protect himself at all times.

“Once we touch gloves it’s fight time – open season. It’s the hurt business, it’s boxing. We’re there to get it on. When I was in the ring, and he was fighting hard, I smiled because I’d seen this before.”

Floyd, who won the WBC title – his third major alphabet championship at welterweight, said that he does not intend on taking another lengthy break away from the sport as he wants to continue fighting in order to please the fans: “I want to stay active for the people who support boxing. I’m not ducking or dodging no opponents. I don’t have to run from none of these fighters. If I want to keep my defense tight and break ‘em down I can.”

Naturally, there will always be the question of pound-for-pound rival Manny Pacquiao. On the subject of the Filipino fighter, Floyd answered ambiguously: “When they say Pacquiao, they say he’s the guy they want to fight Floyd. When they say my name, they say he’s an all time great.”

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Sep 18, 3 years ago

Video: Mayweather Jr’s infamous fourth round with Ortiz and aftermath with Merchant

On The Beak – Admin

Floyd Mayweather Jr enhanced his pantomime villain reputation on Saturday, September 17 at the MGM Grand Garden Arena by not only taking advantage of a naive Victor Ortiz, but also aiming expletives at legendary HBO broadcaster Larry Merchant. The infamous fourth round and post-fight aftermath is highlighted in the embedded video below.

Direct link to article.

(Video embedded below credit – Youtube, Merck191)

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Sep 18, 3 years ago

Morales becomes champion of four weights as he ruins Cano’s face

Robert Delgado – Los Angeles

Erik Morales became a four weight world champion – the first from Mexico – on Saturday, September 17 at the MGM Grand Garden Arena, Las Vegas as the 35-year-old warrior bloodied the face of young challenger Pablo Cesar Cano so much that his corner pulled the 21-year-old out of the contest. Cano had Morales troubled early on, but ultimately had no defence against Erik’s overhand right.

Direct link to article.

Delgado’s scorecard

Round 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Morales 9 9 10 10 9 10 9 10 10 10
- -
Cano
10 10 9 9 10 9 10 9 9 9 - -

Unheralded Mexican prizefighter Pablo Cesar Cano, a late replacement for fan favourite Lucas Matthysse who withdrew citing illness, boxed with the exuberance of youth in the opening stanza while Erik Morales – who shocked the boxing world be rewinding the years to produce a thriller against Marcos Maidana in April – lacked rhythm.

Against Maidana, Morales had to fight from the second round onwards with virtually just the one eye as his other sealed shut due to a grotesque swelling. That wear-and-tear that comes with experience once again showed itself as hard left hands from Cano began to take their toll as early as the second round. Cano forced a fight that Morales was unable to keep up with… he out-threw, out-landed and had greater accuracy than old warhorse “El Terrible” and so the ten scores could only go one way.

Morales lacked any sort of speed but was able to get his right cross off in the third… in the fourth, the one-two that had been his bread-and-butter move for so long, lacked sharpness and pop but Cano in return flurried at air, not flesh. A cut opened up over Cano’s left eye midway through the round. Some fighters react well to blood, inspiring them on to inflict damage onto the one who caused it while others retreat inside themselves. Cano had little time to react, for Morales was invigorated by the cut and sought to aggravate the wound further.

In the fifth, Cano had settled back down and stuck uppercuts and body shots onto Morales’ 35-year-old body. Cano also threw punches in good successions, hammering Morales while the elder statesmen was slow and sluggish on the ropes. The right hand looked a useful weapon for the youngster as he landed it numerous times and it was set-up with the left hook.

The sixth round showed Morales looking to annoy the swelling and cut over Cano’s eye by sticking his jab across it. He’s also throw his lead shot, then crouch down, using head movement to slip any incoming punch then rising back upright and throwing the left hook – the lift creating more force behind the punch.

While Cano’s defence may be lacking, his ability to flurry was never in question as he hit Morales with four-punch combos in the seventh. Morales, too, had begun bleeding and the Mexican ring legend appeared perturbed by the round’s end. Morales, though, turned the tide again in the eighth as he landed the punch of the fight by tanking Cano with an overhand right. In the final minute of the stanza, blood was smeared over the face of the 21-year-old dubbed El Demoledor.

The powerful right hand kept finding it’s target for Morales in the ninth and, with blood streaming from his nose and with swellings now over both eyes, the effect of Morales’ punching looked to have been superior to Cano’s who had failed to capitalise on his early success.

Morales took the fight to Cano in the tenth, chasing him around the ring and harassing him with an array of punches. The more damage that appeared on Cano’s face, the more Erik was determined to win an early stoppage and he thumped double overhand rights onto Cano.

Referee Kenny Bayless asked the ringside physician to examine Cano midway through the fight but, even though he was permitted to carry on, his corner – headed by Rudy Perez – pulled their young ward out of the bout. Morales, therefore, won by way of a technical knockout.

With the win, Erik rose to 52-7-0, 36ko and became the WBC’s latest champion at super lightweight, however, because erstwhile titlist Timothy Bradley was stripped of the honour, many boxing fans won’t recognise Morales’ achievement at 140lbs until an ultimate box-off with Bradley. Cano dropped to 22-1-1, 17ko… he entered the fight as an unknown, but due to his valiant effort his name will not be forgotten and he will likely be welcomed back to Las Vegas.

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